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Mary asks…

what category is the rocky horror picture show in?

I know it’s a musical and a movie but it could be under other categories as well. I just wanted everyone’s opinion on what they thought it was. thanks for your help!
<3

TheatrePlayers answers:

Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

For the original stage play, see The Rocky Horror Show.

The Rocky Horror Picture Show

Theatrical release poster

Directed by

Jim Sharman

Produced by

Lou Adler
Michael White

Written by

Richard O’Brien
Jim Sharman

Starring

Tim Curry
Susan Sarandon
Barry Bostwick
Richard O’Brien
Patricia Quinn
Nell Campbell
Jonathan Adams
Peter Hinwood
Meat Loaf
Charles Gray

Music by

Richard O’Brien
Richard Hartley

Cinematography

Peter Suschitzky

Editing by

Graeme Clifford

Distributed by

20th Century Fox

Release date(s)

August 14, 1975

Running time

100 minutes

Country

United Kingdom
United States

Language

English

Budget

US$1.2 million

Box office

US$139.8 million

The Rocky Horror Picture Show is the 1975 film adaptation of the British rock musical stageplay, The Rocky Horror Show, written by Richard O’Brien. The film is a parody of B-movie, science fiction and horror films of the late 1940s through early 1970s. Director Jim Sharman collaborated on the screenplay with O’Brien, who wrote both the book and lyrics for the stage. The film introduces Tim Curry and features Susan Sarandon and Barry Bostwick along with cast members from the original Kings Road production presented at the Royal Court Theatre, London, in 1973.

Still in limited release 36 years after its premiere, it has the longest-running theatrical release in film history. It gained notoriety as a midnight movie in 1977 when audiences began participating with the film in theatres. Rocky Horror is the first film from a major Hollywood studio to be in the midnight movie market. The motion picture has a large international cult following and is one of the most well known and financially successful midnight movies of all time. In 2005, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

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George asks…

whats a an estimate cost of traveling the UK for 2 weeks?USD?

staying in hostels,spending some on attractions,the tube an food
just looks for some rough estimates

TheatrePlayers answers:

Just like in the US I’m sure., it depends where you are going and what you will be doing. Tell me and i might be able to give you a better idea. In the meantime here’s a rough menu:

hostels: at a guess around £35/night. Book online in advance- and check out your chosen place with tripadviser before you book. You can get a cheap hotel room (travelodge, premier inn) in london for £100 (B&B,per night) . Again, shop around online or they will cost more. If there are two of you a hotel might work out better.

Tube: get an oyster card from the first underground station you hit. They cost £5 but then you just top them up with cash from a person or a machine, and they register electronically as you pass through barriers. Each single journey done this way will cost under £2, instead of £4 if you bought a singel ticket. If you are having a full day, stayign in zone 1, you will spend around £6.50 a day- it;s capped at this if you travel after 9.30am in the morning. It will take more money off you if you go to outlying zones (eg for Kew Gardens, Hampton Court etc). The oyster card works on buses too.

Pint of beer in a pub £2.50 outside london, £3.50 in central london
cheap (but nice) bottle of wine in a supermarket: £5. In a pub/restaurant, the same bottle will cost you £10 minimum.

Train fares: omg these are so high. If you are travelling much, and by train whatever you do buy the tickets in advance. I live 350 miles from london. If I buy a return ticket two weeks in advance it can cost as little as £75. On the same day I want to travel, £250. Also, use your student card if you have one- research this thoroughly- there are loads of discount cards but they must be bought in adavance and might not suit you if you dont have friends here to arrange them for you. If you want freedom and you are in a group you may be better off hiring a car for a week. ‘Enterprise’ are good and pretty reasonable.

The cheapest way to travel is to go by coach, National Epress is the best and very cheap. Again, cheaper if you buy online and in advance. If you are going to Scotland get their sleeper from Victoria Station and you won’t waste any time, plus you’ll save on a hotel that night.

What else might you want to do:
A day out at a theme park or other attraction. You wont have much change left from £20 per person for heritage attractions. £40 per head for theme parks, although no one pays full price for these; there is always a 2 for 1 offer somewhere online.

A loaf of bread costs £1.20. A pint of milk costs 50p. 500g bag of dry pasta/spaghetti: £1. Box of cereal £2

Eating out : indian and chinese restaurants are the cheapest ‘sit down’ restaurants, after burger bars of course. Make sure you arent in a really posh area- where even indians/chineses can be pricey. Go to somewhere like Brick Lane in London and you can eat OK indian food like a king for a fiver. You must haggle with the waiters touting in the street though, before you go inside the restaurant. There’s a great little book called ‘time out cheap eats’. Get it and you can eat really well.

Hope this helps!
Sam

Old fashioned london caffs are where you can get a huge fried ‘Full english’ breakfast for around a fiver. Head out at around 9am, and look for somewhere with lots of workmen in hi visibility jackets, or old men with newspapers. Otherwise they will have plastic-topped tables and no decoration- think prison visiting room.

Free stuff: tate britain,tate modern, the british library, muse of london, hanging out on the south bank of thames by the london eye, hanging out on the south bank of the thames next to the festival hall on sunday afternoons etc etc. Get a guide book.

Cheap theatre tickets (£20ish each)- little booth in leicester square- look for the queue of tourists.

If you are under 25 you might be able to get a discount £5 ticket from the box office for some shows (some shakespeare, opera, dance, non commercial stuff) and you have to queue on the day, before the box office. Look online for details.

Outside london, west wales is cheap, full of cute villages and surfers. Check out St Davids- great campsite with it’s own beach.

Or hitchike from London to Stonehenge, walk/hitch to avebury, find west kennet long barrow (just outside) and sleep inside. Someone may come and tell you off but as long as you leave no mess you should be ok.

Paul asks…

can u tell me about daniel radcliffe?

what does he likes and more of it.

TheatrePlayers answers:

Daniel Jacob Radcliffe (born 23 July 1989) is an English actor, best known for playing the wizard Harry Potter in each of the first five films based on the best-selling book series, written by J. K. Rowling.

Early life:
Daniel Radcliffe was born in Fulham, London, the only child of Alan Radcliffe (a literary agent) and Marcia Gresham (a casting agent, who was involved in several films for the BBC). At age five, he expressed a desire to act. In December 1999, he made his first on-screen appearance as the title character in the BBC’s televised version of the Dickens novel David Copperfield.

Career
In 1999, Radcliffe was selected to star as the wizard Harry Potter in a big-budget adaptation of the popular book series by J.K. Rowling, after auditions involving thousands of applicants. Radcliffe’s first theatrical film appearance was in 2001, a small supporting role in The Tailor of Panama. His first starring role as Harry Potter, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (released in the United States as Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone), was released later that year and became a large financial success. It was, at the time, the second highest grossing movie of all time.

In 2002, Radcliffe reprised his role in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. Co-starring was Kenneth Branagh, who that same year directed the stage production, The Play What I Wrote, in which Radcliffe made an appearance. In 2004 and 2005, Radcliffe returned to the Potter franchise in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban and Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. The films continued to produce high box office results and were considered successful worldwide.

Radcliffe’s next release will be the independent Australian film, December Boys. Filming on Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix began in early 2006, and the film is currently scheduled for release in 2007. Radcliffe will also appear on the television sitcom, Extras.

At the age of 16, Radcliffe became the youngest non-royal ever to have an individual portrait in England’s National Portrait Gallery. He was only 14 when he posed for artist Stuart Pearson Wright while on a break from filming the Potter movies. On April 13th 2006, his portrait was unveiled as part of a new exhibition opening at London’s National Theatre and then moved to the National Portrait Gallery where it currently resides. Daniel Radcliffe.com

Personal life
Radcliffe was previously educated at Sussex House School, Knightsbridge, and is currently educated at the public City of London School. He has two dogs named Binka and Nugget.

He plays bass guitar and is a rock music fan who admires a diverse lineup of bands, from The Beatles to The Arctic Monkeys [1]. As well as being a fan of Fulham Football Club, Daniel was a follower of Formula One Racing. While on set, to keep busy, Daniel enjoys playing table tennis and video games with his other cast members.

Radcliffe’s personal fortune has now exceeded GB £23 million making him one of the richest teenagers in the United Kingdom [2]. Radcliffe has been a supporter of various charities, including the Demelza House, to which he has requested fans make donations in lieu of sending him birthday presents.

Sandy asks…

Can you give any information about Harry potter star Daniel Radcliffe?

TheatrePlayers answers:

Daniel Jacob Radcliffe[1] (born July 23, 1989) is an English actor, best known for playing the wizard Harry Potter in each of the first five films based on the best-selling book series, written by J. K. Rowling.
Biography
Career
At age five, Radcliffe expressed a desire to act. In December 1999, he made his first on-screen appearance as the title character in the BBC’s televised version of the Dickens novel David Copperfield, portraying the title character as a young boy.

In 1999, Radcliffe was selected to portray the wizard Harry Potter in the big-budget adaptations of the popular book series by J.K. Rowling following auditions involving thousands of applicants. Radcliffe’s first theatrical film appearance was in 2001 in a small supporting role in The Tailor of Panama; his first film as Potter, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (released in the United States as Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone), was released later that year and became what was then the second highest grossing film of all time.

In 2002, Radcliffe reprised his role in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. Co-starring was Kenneth Branagh, who that same year directed the stage production, The Play What I Wrote, in which Radcliffe made an appearance. In 2004 and 2005, Radcliffe returned to the Potter franchise in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban and Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. The films continued to produce high box office results and were considered successful worldwide.

Radcliffe’s next release will be the independent Australian film, December Boys. Filming on Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix began in early 2006, and the film is currently scheduled for release in 2007. In 2007, Radcliffe will appear in a revival of the play Equus, written by Peter Shaffer, in which he will play Alan Strang, a stable boy who becomes obsessed with his horses. During the course of the play, Radcliffe is set to appear nude which, given the actor’s age, has attracted some media attention.[2] He has also announced that he will appear as Rudyard Kipling’s son in the ITV drama My Boy Jack, starting filming in July 2007.[3] He will also appear in the second series of the British sitcom Extras, and footage of him in the show has appeared on the internet. In the scene, Radcliffe is shown planning to have sex with Ashley Jensen’s character Maggie Jacobs.

At the age of 16, Radcliffe became the youngest non-royal ever to have an individual portrait in England’s National Portrait Gallery. He was only 14 when he posed for artist Stuart Pearson Wright while on a break from filming Harry Potter. On 13 April 2006, his portrait was unveiled as part of a new exhibition opening at London’s Royal National Theatre and then moved to the National Portrait Gallery where it currently resides.[4]

Personal life
Radcliffe was born in Fulham, London, the only child of Alan Radcliffe (a literary agent) and Marcia Gresham (a casting agent, who was involved in several films for the BBC). They have two dogs named Binka and Nugget.

He was previously educated at Sussex House School, Knightsbridge, and is currently educated at the public City of London School. He achieved straight A grades in the three AS-levels he sat in 2006[1], and will now take a break from education in the academic year 2006/07.

Radcliffe plays bass guitar (he was taught by Gary Oldman) and is a rock music fan who admires a diverse lineup of bands, from The Beatles to Arctic Monkeys.[5] As well as being a fan of Fulham Football Club, Radcliffe was a follower of Formula One Racing. While on set, to keep busy, he enjoys playing table tennis and video games with his cast members.

Radcliffe’s personal fortune has now exceeded GB £23 million making him one of the richest teenagers in the United Kingdom.[6] He is reported to have earned approximately £150,000 for the first Potter film, about £5.6 million last year, and is expected to rake in more than £8 million for the next film, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. [7] Radcliffe has been a supporter of various charities, including Demelza House Children’s Hospice, to which he has requested fans make donations in lieu of sending him birthday presents.

Acting Credits
MEDIUM PROJECT YEAR RELEASED CHARACTER DIRECTOR
TV David Copperfield 1999 Young David Copperfield Simon Curtis
FILM The Tailor of Panama 2001 Mark Pendel John Boorman
FILM Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone 2001 Harry Potter Chris Columbus
FILM Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets 2002 Harry Potter Chris Columbus
STAGE/WEST END The Play What I Wrote 2002 Guest Kenneth Branagh
FILM Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban 2004 Harry Potter Alfonso Cuarón
FILM Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire 2005 Harry Potter Mike Newell
TV Foley and McColl: This Way Up 2005 Traffic Warden Ed Bye
TV Extras 2006 Boy Scout/Himself Ricky Gervais
FILM December Boys 2006(TBR) Maps Rod Hardy
STAGE/WEST END Equus 2007 (TBR) Alan Strang Thea Sharrock
FILM Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix 2007 (TBR) Harry Potter David Yates
TV My Boy Jack 2007 (TBR) John “Jack” Kipling TBA
FILM Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (IN TALKS) 2008 (TBR) Harry Potter TBA

TBA: To Be Announced
TBR: To Be Released

Awards
Nominations
2006

Best Young Actor (Broadcast Film Critics Association Awards)
Actor of the Year (AOL Moviefone Moviegoer Awards)
Best Performance by a Young Actor (Saturn Awards)
Best Hero (MTV Movie Awards)
Best On-Screen Team (with Emma Watson and Rupert Grint; MTV Movie Awards)
2005

Best Performance by a Young Actor (Saturn Awards)
Best Young Actor (Broadcast Film Critics Association Awards)
2003

Best Performance by a Young Actor (Saturn Awards)
Best Acting Ensemble (Phoenix Film Critics Society Awards)
Most Unforgettable Scene (for the scene “Harry Battles The Basilisk” in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets) (American Moviegoer Awards)
2002

Best Performance by a Young Actor (Saturn Awards)
Best Young Preformer (Broadcast Film Critics Association Awards)
Breakthrough Male Performance (MTV Movie Awards)
Best Newcomer (Phoenix Film Critics Society Awards)
Best Debut (with Emma Watson and Rupert Grint) (Sony Ericsson Empire Awards)
Outstanding Actor (American Moviegoer Awards)
Best Performance in a Feature Film: Leading Young Actor (Young Artist Awards)
Best Ensemble in a Feature Film (with Emma Watson and Rupert Grint Young Artist Awards)
[edit]
Wins
2006

Best Actor (Cine Awards, Belgium)
Best Male Film Star (Gold): Otto Awards, 2006
2005

Best Young Actor (SyFy Portal’s SyFy Genre Awards)
2004

Top 10 Child Stars (RTL Television, Germany)
Best Breakthrough Male Actor (Star Channel Star Awards, Japan)
Best Junior Achiever (for viewers’ favorite under-16 guest on the show Relly Awards)
Young Talent of the Year (ITV Celebrity Awards)
Best Movie Actor (K-Zone Kids Awards, Philippines)
Best Film Star/Actor (Dutch Kids Choice Awards)
2003

Best Young Actor (SyFy Portal’s SyFy Genre Awards)
Best Actor (Roadshow Cinema Grand Prix Awards, Japan)
2002

Person of the Year (Time For Kids)
Targa d’Oro (“Gold Plate”, David di Donatello Awards)
Outstanding New Talent (Sir James Carreras Award for the Variety Club Showbusiness Awards)
2001

Male Youth Discovery of the Year (Hollywood Women’s Press Club)

Robert asks…

London Sightseeing?

I’m going to London next weekend. What are good places to visit?

TheatrePlayers answers:

London for Free

The exchange rate may sting, but there’s one conversion that’ll never change: £0 = $0. Here are our picks for the top free things to do in London.
Free Art

Many of London’s biggest and best cultural attractions are free to enter, and the number of museums offering free entry is staggering. Donations are often more than welcome, and special exhibits usually cost extra.

Major Museums

British Museum

Burgh House and the Hampstead Museum

Clown’s Gallery and Museum

Guildhall

Houses of Parliament

Imperial War Museum

Museum of Childhood

Museum of London

National Gallery

National Maritime Museum, Queen’s House, and Royal Observatory

National Portrait Gallery

Natural History Museum

Royal Exchange

Science Museum

Sir John Soane’s Museum

Tate Britain

Tate Modern

Theatre Museum

Victoria & Albert Museum

Wallace Collection

Smaller Galleries

Hogarth House

ICA Gallery

Serpentine Gallery

Whitechapel Art Gallery

Courtauld Permanent Exhibition (Monday only)

Free Concerts

St. Paul’s Cathedral, St. Martin’s in the Fields, and St. James’s Church, have regular lunchtime concerts, as does St. George Bloomsbury on Monday, Hyde Park Chapel on Thursday, and St. Giles in the Fields on Friday. There are regular organ recitals at Westminster Abbey.

Of the music colleges, the Royal Academy of Music, the Royal College of Music, the Guildhall, and the Royal Opera House have regular recitals, the Trinity College of Music, holds recitals at lunchtime on Tuesday.

For contemporary ears, the area outside the National Theatre on the South Bank (known as the Djanogly Concert Pitch) reverberates to live world music weekdays at 6 PM, and on Saturday at 1 PM and 6 PM.

Another regularly excellent venue is the Spitz bistro and gallery, in Spitalfields market, which has free live jazz and classical gigs four times a week; get there early to bag a table.

You can catch decent open-mike nights for unsigned acts and singer songwriters at the River Bar (just south of Tower Bridge) every Wednesday, and Roadhouse (in Covent Garden) every Monday. Blues lovers should not miss the legendary Billy Chong Blues Revue band jam every Monday at the Globe pub in Hackney. The Palm Tree, in Mile End, is another great East End pub that has accomplished local jazz players on weekends.

(Almost) Free Theater & Opera

Sloane Square’s Royal Court Theatre, one of the United Kingdom’s best venues for new playwriting, has restricted-view, standing-room-only tickets at the downstairs Jerwood Theatre for 10 pence (yes, £0.10), available one hour before the performance.

The Battersea Arts Club (BAC) has pay-what-you-can night on Tuesday for many of its shows.

If all seats have been sold, the English National Opera sells standing tickets for the back of the Dress and Upper Circles at £5 each. Check at the box office.

Standing tickets with obstructed views for the ballet or the opera at the Royal Opera House in Covent Garden start at £4.

Free (and Almost Free) Movies

Free outdoor screenings of cult films (such as Donnie Darko and Pulp Fiction), sponsored by Stella Artois and held at different parks every year, have become a London summer institution: pack a picnic and stake out your spot early.

The Prince Charles Cinema in the West End shows weekday matinees for £3.

Free Offbeat Experiences

Go to the Public Record Office in Kew or Islington if you have a few hours to kill and want to track down some ancient branch of the family tree. Even if you don’t have any leads, browsing through sheaves of ancient ledgers is great fun.

If you came to London for spectacle, take a trip to a trial at the Old Bailey, the highest court in the land. Stories more twisted and compelling than anything on screen, strange costumes and wigs, command performances — it’s true drama, without the West End ticket prices.

London has some of the finest parks in the world, and enjoying them won’t cost you a pretty pence. Keen ornithologists can join free bird-watching walks in Hyde Park, while dedicated strollers touched by royal nostalgia can take the 7-mi Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Walk through Hyde, Green, and St. James’s Parks.

Although London’s street markets are not in the habit of giving away merchandise for nothing, it’s free to browse their stalls, taking in second-hand booksellers under Waterloo Bridge, fishmongers in Borough Market, and funky jewelry designers in Portobello.

For human interest, you can’t beat Covent Garden for its marvelous array of street performers and buskers, whose unlikely skills — imitating statues, balancing footballs on their noses, juggling fire, playing the banjo with their teeth — can hold any crowd’s attention.

There are free spectacles throughout the year, but one of the most warmly enjoyed is Guy Fawkes’ Night (November 5), when parks throughout the country hold spectacular fireworks displays: Alexandra Palace and Ravenscourt Park are two of the best.

On New Year’s Eve thousands of revelers descend on Trafalgar Square and the South Bank to watch more free fireworks. The Underground usually runs all night, and is free into the new year.

Finally, set aside some time for random wandering. London is a great walking city because so many of its real treasures are untouted: tiny alleyways barely visible on the map, garden squares, churchyards, shop windows, sudden vistas of skyline or park. With comfortable, weatherproof shoes and an umbrella, walking might well become your favorite free activity here.
London’s Top Attractions

Westminster Abbey

The most exciting church in the land is the final resting place for the men and women who built Britain. Its great Gothic hall continues to play a part in the formation of the kingdom, having hosted nearly every coronation since 1308.
Buckingham Palace

Not the prettiest royal palace, but a must-see for the glimpse it affords of modern royal life. The opulence of the state rooms open to the public provides plenty to gasp at, and don’t forget the collection of china and carriages at the Queen’s Gallery and Royal Mews next door.

St. Paul’s Cathedral

No matter how many times you have been before, the scale and elegance of Sir Christopher Wren’s masterpiece never fail to take the breath away. Climb the enormous dome, third largest in the world, to experience the freaky acoustics of the Whispering Gallery, and higher still for fantastic views across London.

Tower of London

The Tower is London at its majestic, idiosyncratic best. This is the heart of the kingdom — with foundations dating back nine centuries, every brick tells a story, and the axe-blows and fortunes that have risen and fallen within this turreted mini-city provide an inexhaustible supply of intrigue.

British Museum

If you want to journey through time and space without leaving the confines of Bloomsbury, a visit to the British Museum has hours of eye-catching artifacts from the world’s greatest civilizations, including the Elgin Marbles, the Rosetta Stone, and the Sutton Hoo treasure.

Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre

You can catch a Shakespeare play almost every night of the year in London. But standing on a floor of leaves and sawdust, and watching an offering from the Great Bard in a painstakingly re-created version of the galleried Tudor theater for which he wrote is a special thrill.

Greenwich Meridian Line

Home of maritime London, Greenwich has a special charm. Most fun is climbing up to the Royal Observatory, surrounded by acres of green and magnificent river views, and straddling western and eastern hemispheres at 0° longitude.

Hampton Court Palace

This collection of buildings and gardens won over Henry VIII to become his favorite royal residence. Its Tudor charm, augmented by touches from Wren, and a picturesque upstream Thames location make it a great day out — not even dour Oliver Cromwell, who moved here in 1653, could resist its charms.

Tate Modern

More of an event than the average museum visit, Tate Modern, housed inside a striking 1930s power station, is a hip, immensely successful addition to the London gallery landscape. Passing judgment on the latest controversial temporary exhibit inside the giant turbine hall has become almost a civic pastime among art-loving Londoners.

National Gallery

Whatever the collective noun is for a set of Old Masters — A palette? A canvas? — there are enough here to have the most casual art enthusiast purring with admiration. When you’ve finished, enjoy the newly pedestrian Trafalgar Square on the doorstep.

London’s central parks

With London’s green spaces so broken up, it seems churlish to pick out only one. The four central parks are all within walking distance: pick St. James’s Park for fairytale views; Green Park for hillocks and wide boulevards; Regent’s Park for its open-air theater and the London Zoo; and Hyde Park for rowing on the Serpentine Lido.

London grew from a wooden bridge built over the Thames in the year AD 43 to its current 600 square mi and 7 million souls in haphazard fashion, meandering from its two official centers: Westminster, seat of government and royalty, to the west, and the City, site of finance and commerce, to the east. In these two areas are most of the grand buildings that have played a central role in British history: the Tower of London and St. Paul’s Cathedral, Westminster Abbey and the Houses of Parliament, Buckingham Palace, and the older royal palace of St. James’s. However, London’s unofficial centers multiply and mutate year after year, and it would be a shame to stop only at the postcard views. Life is not lived in monuments, as the patrician patrons of the great Georgian architects understood when they commissioned the city’s elegant squares and town houses. Within a few minutes’ walk of Buckingham Palace, for instance, lie St. James’s and Mayfair, neighboring quarters of elegant town houses built for the nobility during the 17th and early 18th centuries and now notable for shopping opportunities. Westminster Abbey’s original vegetable patch (or convent garden), which became the site of London’s first square, Covent Garden, is now an unmissable stop.

Hyde Park and Kensington Gardens, preserved by past kings and queens for their own hunting and relaxation, create a swath of green parkland across the city center. A walk across Hyde Park brings you to the museum district of South Kensington, with the Natural History Museum, the Science Museum, and the Victoria & Albert Museum. If the great parks such as Hyde Park are, in Lord Chatham’s phrase, “the lungs of London,” then the River Thames is its backbone. The fast-developing South Bank has many cultural highlights: the theaters of the South Bank Centre, the Hayward and Saatchi galleries, Tate Modern, and the reconstruction of Shakespeare’s Globe theater. The London Eye observation wheel here gives stunning city views, or you can walk across the Millennium or Hungerford bridges. Farther downstream is the gorgeous 17th- and 18th-century symmetry of Greenwich, where the world’s time is measured.

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